jillthompson:

arr-pirate:

friendly-fyres:

 i found you a nicely apt description of what the fucking friendzone is

Source

I feel this needs to be re blogged….

(via mashka-mashka)

smalldisgruntledcorgi:

honestly if you dont think like, the tumblr feminist scene, with all the occasionally cheesy kawaii-aesthetic misandry art, hasn’t had an impact on anyone at all like

you don’t remember what the average teen girl in a fandom was like before this. you don’t remember how we used to make hate-sites about female characters who “got in the way”, games where you could beat them up, how much we hate our gender and bragged about not being like other girls, used to completely reject everything girly. a lot of us just wanted to be one of the guys. there was a lot of internalised misogyny there

now you get these 15 year old girls loving other girls and loving themselves fiercely, even at the total cost of male approval and just. god. if like 14-year-old me could see this shit now. 

and like if you dont think teen girls learning to love themselves and their body and each other isnt important than i do not know what to say to you

(via charlesmmacaulay)

phiasmir:

rebeccacohenart:

So sick of people who pretend their problem is with the word “feminism” rather than the concept of gender equality.

FUKIN REKT

phiasmir:

rebeccacohenart:

So sick of people who pretend their problem is with the word “feminism” rather than the concept of gender equality.

FUKIN REKT

(via horticulturalcephalopod)

emperorhomosexual:

capitolhillofficial:

Dragons are henceforth a feminist icon. You’re no longer allowed to participate in the appreciation of dragons and dragons in culture unless you’re totally down for helping the equality movement. 

Anti-feminist blogs are mad about this post so everyone should reblog it.

if it pisses off anti-feminists, i’m all for it.

(via that-crazy-place-called-my-mind)

houseofalexzander:

Lustrous.

A man in the grocery store line today approached me and said, “Sir, when I first saw you I was extremely attracted to you, but then I noticed that you are a boy. How… I mean, why do you dress so provocatively?”

I responded, “Well, in today’s world the majority of the straight male race view women as objects, or something that belongs to them. I dress provocatively because it attracts the attention of men in a sexual and OBJECTIVE way. However, when realized that I am actually male, they often become confused, disgusted, upset or all of the above. By inflicting this minor emotional damaged upon the ego of a man raised by twisted societal gender norms, maybe, just maybe the individual will think twice before viewing another woman with an objective attitude and sense of belonging. No woman, belongs to ANYONE. Male or female, the equality of human beings needs to be a priority. It is something worth dressing up for.”

I AM NOT KIDDING. The woman behind me, the female cashier, the old lady bagging groceries and the woman in front of me who was talking on the phone STOPPED, …. and proceeded to gasp and clap. The man shook my hand, told me to have a blessed day and then said, “excuse me ladies, I need to visit my daughter.”

…. I was shaking by the time I walked out of the store.

- Elliott Alexzander

(via grillionaire)

cuteosphere:

Small victories

(via stfufauxminists)

amandapalmer:

helloimtarnah:

sierramckenzie:

This is hard for me to post but I feel like it is important. I remember hating my face and hating my skin and looking at all the girls around me in middle school and on tv and in ads and feeling like I was a monstrosity in comparison. But I remember the first time I realized women plucked their eyebrows. And wore concealer. And foundation. And powder. I felt like I had been lied to about what women look like. After modeling and realizing when photographers asked for no makeup, they really meant the photo on the right. I started realizing that the photo on the right was what was in skincare ads and posted by people claiming in the caption to be wearing no makeup some of the time. The photo on the right is the bare minimum of what we expect women to look like when they wake up in the morning. I think makeup can be empowering, but I think that acknowledging that it isn’t natural is important. Modeling and wearing makeup so often makes me especially feel like its important to sometimes be uncomfortably honest about how much of the media we consume is altered in some way. Part of me wanted to wait until my skin was better to do this concept but I realized that was totally missing the point. Thanks for taking the time to read.Photography and Graphic Design by Mark Laubenheimer.

This completely messed up my brain when I was a child. I didn’t know celebrities wore makeup, I thought they were naturally perfect and I was this hideous monster who had to change because I was WRONG as a human.

as someone go currently has two cold sores and two giant zits on her chin due to touring, lack of sleep, bad airplane air and stage make-up application and removal every night … this is hitting at a perfect moment.
ever true and always a good reminder. the shit you see in 99% of magazines is photoshopped to death.
people have pores.

amandapalmer:

helloimtarnah:

sierramckenzie:

This is hard for me to post but I feel like it is important. 

I remember hating my face and hating my skin and looking at all the girls around me in middle school and on tv and in ads and feeling like I was a monstrosity in comparison. But I remember the first time I realized women plucked their eyebrows. And wore concealer. And foundation. And powder. I felt like I had been lied to about what women look like. After modeling and realizing when photographers asked for no makeup, they really meant the photo on the right. I started realizing that the photo on the right was what was in skincare ads and posted by people claiming in the caption to be wearing no makeup some of the time. The photo on the right is the bare minimum of what we expect women to look like when they wake up in the morning. 

I think makeup can be empowering, but I think that acknowledging that it isn’t natural is important. Modeling and wearing makeup so often makes me especially feel like its important to sometimes be uncomfortably honest about how much of the media we consume is altered in some way. 

Part of me wanted to wait until my skin was better to do this concept but I realized that was totally missing the point. 

Thanks for taking the time to read.

Photography and Graphic Design by Mark Laubenheimer.

This completely messed up my brain when I was a child. I didn’t know celebrities wore makeup, I thought they were naturally perfect and I was this hideous monster who had to change because I was WRONG as a human.

as someone go currently has two cold sores and two giant zits on her chin due to touring, lack of sleep, bad airplane air and stage make-up application and removal every night … this is hitting at a perfect moment.

ever true and always a good reminder. the shit you see in 99% of magazines is photoshopped to death.

people have pores.

"Pacific Rim" is a proof of concept.

raptorific:

The more I think about Pacific Rim, the more I realize that half the stuff in there is stuff that’s never done because people say it’ll keep a movie from being successful. There’s so many tropes inverted, and it’s all done so right.

  • Raleigh’s story begins moving forward because of a death of a loved one. Rather than it being a girlfriend, a mother, or a sister, it was his brother. The movie literally starts with a man being put in the refrigerator. In fact, through the entire film, no woman dies to advance the characterization of a man. 
  • There’s three lead characters in the film. One is an Asian woman. One is a Black man. One is a white man. In many situations like this, the white man’s story would default to the A-plot, while the other two characters would either have a subplot, or spend the entire film as support extensions of the white male lead’s A-plot. In “Pacific Rim,” however, the story of Mako and Stacker is the A-plot, and Raleigh is the one whose development is a subplot and whose role in the film is largely supportive to the A-plot. 
  • Speaking of the A-plot, it’s a coming-of-age, heartfelt father-daughter story that shows both the daughter’s struggle to respect her father’s instructions despite them being contrary to her desires, and the father’s struggle to trust his daughter to take care of herself and accept the fact that she’s grown up and he can’t protect her forever. That’s a pretty common theme in movies, but what’s the proportion of those movies where the father and daughter are white? Pretty damn high. The proportion of movies where it’s a father and daughter of color is practically statistically insignificant. The fact that this familiar story is shown not only with a man of color as the concerned father and a woman of color as the grown daughter, but also that it’s a situation of interracial adoption, is magnificent. 
  • The core of the story revolves around a woman who’s an action star, is feminine without being sexualized, and who has her own motivations and acts for her own reasons, independent of the men around her. Even though she is not blind to the presence of the men in the story, and she considers them as much as they consider her, she is not an extension of any of them. 
  • It’s a blockbuster action film that shows a friendship between a man and a woman who have lots of chemistry, but is not a romantic relationship. In fact, not a single one of the characters’ storylines includes a romantic subplot. I remember for the last few months, I would ask people to name one feel-good movie that doesn’t have a romantic subplot. People would almost always reply that there is no such movie, or that such a movie isn’t possible. 

And that’s the thing. These are all features of a movie that people say are impossible to pull off, or won’t play with audience, or won’t make money, but in Pacific Rim, it proves that “it doesn’t work” isn’t the reason. Pacific Rim has gotten overwhelming critical praise, garnered a cult following within days, as well as being near-universally loved by audiences. Put aside the fact that it proves movies about gigantic mechas and monsters smashing buildings and punching each other can be smart (meaning Michael Bay has no excuse), it proves that movies don’t need to be about white men first, white women second, and everybody else third, if at all, and the rest of Hollywood has no excuse for their insistence on making movies that way.

(via charlesmmacaulay)

comeunbraced:

i’m not a gamer, but this is some important shit

comeunbraced:

i’m not a gamer, but this is some important shit

(via mashka-mashka)